Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Nube
Mensajes: 211
Registrado: Dom Abr 01, 2012 7:21 am

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Nube » Sab Ago 24, 2019 12:03 pm

Los calentamientos estratosféricos deforman y llevan a la disminución de agujero también en el sur. Un aumento de la temperatura estratosférica lleva a una disminución de las nubes estratosféricas polares que sirven de base para que se produzcan las reacciones que liberan el cloro que después elimina el ozono.
El pronóstico de ozono ya está mostrando una deformación del vórtice y por lo tanto el agujero para fines de agosto:
http://www.temis.nl/ozone/
Habrá que ver cuál es el efecto sobre todo el ciclo (creo que otros calentamientos estratosféricos ocurrieron cuando el agujero estaba más desarrollado).

Datos históricos en https://ozonewatch.gsfc.nasa.gov/statis ... _data.html

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Mié Ago 28, 2019 6:55 pm

Bueno. Parece que este mes de junio se registraron relámpagos a 88º N nada menos.
Una lástima que no se puede entrar al enlace si no se está suscripto al Washington Post.
Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Avatar de Usuario
Ezequiel95
Mensajes: 9049
Registrado: Jue Dic 10, 2015 12:33 pm
Ubicación: Merlo, Buenos Aires
Contactar:

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ezequiel95 » Mié Ago 28, 2019 7:20 pm

Ernest escribió:Bueno. Parece que este mes de junio se registraron relámpagos a 88º N nada menos.
Una lástima que no se puede entrar al enlace si no se está suscripto al Washington Post.
Yo puedo ver la nota, te la guardé en la wayback machine:
https://web.archive.org/web/20190828222 ... ng-record/
Por las dudas también la dejó acá:


ORIGINAL:

The closest observed lightning strikes to the North Pole occurred on June 28 and were 200 miles farther north than the storm on Aug. 10 and 11 that made headlines, a new analysis shows. The data was provided to The Washington Post by Vaisala, which operates a ground-based global lightning detection system.

The June lightning discharges were as close as 110 miles to the North Pole, according to the data. These strikes were found when, prompted by the August lightning discharges, Vaisala researchers looked back through their records to see whether there had been any lightning discharges that were even closer to the top of the Northern Hemisphere.

The answer, much to the researchers’ surprise, was yes.

According to an analysis relying on Vaisala’s GLD360 lightning detection network, there were a remarkable 19 lightning discharges between 130 and 110 miles from the North Pole over a 10-hour period on June 28, including a cloud-to-sea ice lightning strike, said Ryan Said, a Vaisala research scientist and systems engineer who helped develop the GLD360 system.

“The closest flash during this weather event was within 110 miles of the North Pole at 16:40:33 UTC — making it the closest lightning flash to the North Pole on record,” Vaisala said in a statement. “A lightning flash is defined as any discharge of atmospheric electricity (which could include either intra-cloud or cloud-to-ground strokes of lightning)."

These lightning strikes were north of 88 degrees north latitude, compared with the August lighting discharges, which were just above 85 degrees and came within about 300 miles of the North Pole.

The GLD360 system detects lightning using radio sensors around the world.

[Lightning struck near the North Pole 48 times on Saturday, as rapid Arctic warming continues]

After the August Arctic thunderstorm, Vaisala examined its database to see whether there had been previous and similar lightning activity.

“What we found was so unusual we needed to investigate further to ensure everything was consistent with our data,” the company said in a statement.

Vaisala’s network began tracking global lightning activity in 2009, but the company has archives of its data going back to 2012 only. The network can distinguish between lightning discharges within clouds and those that occur between clouds and the ground.

“Looking back through our data over the last eight summers, we don’t see any previous lightning activity that was ever this close to the northernmost point on the planet,” the company said.

The lightning strikes may be another sign of a rapidly changing Arctic climate, although it’s possible that lightning that close to the pole has happened before and just not been observed.

The rarity of Arctic lightning observations prompted Said and his research team to work for two weeks to validate and visualize the data to ensure there were no errors involved. They compared the lightning data with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite observations and found a weather system over the Arctic on June 28 that was capable of producing lightning discharges.

“Additionally, we looked at our GLD360’s sensors and each lightning flash was confirmed by at least four sensors (three is needed for validation). One lightning flash was confirmed by more than half of our sensors,” the company said in a statement.


The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy navigates fog and ice in the Arctic Ocean on Aug. 1, 2017. (Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post)
“If we saw the lightning events from June 28, 2019, almost anywhere else on Earth, we would not have questioned their validity,” Said said. He said there is lingering uncertainty, because if the radio waves emitted by a lightning flash are too weak to be detected by at least three of Vaisala’s sensors, the detection network won’t register it.

“So, while the lightning rate in this storm was undoubtedly quite low — we only detected 19 flashes over a 10-hour time span — there may be more flashes that we did not detect,” Said said.

“Bottom line, based on our data going back to 2012, June 28, 2019, is the date of the closest lighting flash to the North Pole on record — at 110 miles. This flash was recorded much earlier and is far closer than the recent Aug. 10, 2019 detection.”

Arctic thunderstorms may be more common
The presence of thunderstorms means that the atmosphere near the North Pole was unstable enough, with sufficient warm and moist air in the lower to middle atmosphere, to give rise to them. Typically, the air is too cold and stable in that part of the world to support the ingredients needed for such storms. Said speculated that the lightning was sparked by moist, unstable air at higher altitudes that was imported from parts of the Arctic that lacked sea ice at the time, given that the air in the lowest layers of the atmosphere above sea ice is typically too stable to rise high enough into the atmosphere to form thunderstorms.

“The lifting mechanism was very likely just above cool air just above the ice,” he said in an interview.

The vast majority of Earth’s thunderstorms occur at lower latitudes, where the combination of higher temperatures and humidity more easily sparks them. However, as Alaska and other parts of the Arctic have warmed in response to human-caused global climate change, thunderstorms are starting earlier in the year and are extending to areas that didn’t used to see many such events such as Alaska’s North Slope.

According to Said, the GLD360 network detects about 2.5 billion lightning discharges each year, or about 80 discharges every second. However, only a few thunderstorms per year are detected above the Arctic Circle.


Zack Labe

@ZLabe
Widespread above average sea surface temperatures continue around nearly the entire Arctic Ocean. This is particularly evident in areas of open water where sea ice cover would have been found in past years.

[Graphic and methods from http://ocean.dmi.dk/satellite/index.uk.php …]

Map of sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arctic Ocean
130
10:47 PM - Aug 19, 2019
Twitter Ads info and privacy
117 people are talking about this
The near-record loss of sea ice across the Arctic in the summer has led to significantly above-average sea surface temperatures throughout the Arctic, which may be contributing to unusually warm and humid air masses — even over the remaining ice pack across the central Arctic Ocean. Alaska, for example, has seen humidity hover far above average, belying that state’s reputation for mainly cool, dry summers.

Vaisala’s detection system uses sensors that can detect the very low-frequency radio signals associated with lightning discharges more than 6,000 miles away. By combining arrival time and angle information from multiple sensors, the network can pick up greater than 80 percent of lightning strikes and pinpoint their location with a median accuracy of about a mile and a half.

ESPAÑOL:
Los rayos más cercanos observados al Polo Norte ocurrieron el 28 de junio y fueron 200 millas más al norte que la tormenta del 10 y 11 de agosto que llegaron a los titulares, según muestra un nuevo análisis. Los datos fueron proporcionados a The Washington Post por Vaisala, que opera un sistema global de detección de rayos basado en tierra.

Las descargas de rayos de junio estaban tan cerca como 110 millas del Polo Norte, según los datos. Estos ataques se encontraron cuando, provocados por las descargas de rayos de agosto, los investigadores de Vaisala revisaron sus registros para ver si había habido descargas de rayos que estuvieran aún más cerca de la parte superior del hemisferio norte.

La respuesta, para sorpresa de los investigadores, fue sí.

Según un análisis basado en la red de detección de rayos GLD360 de Vaisala, hubo un notable 19 descargas de rayos entre 130 y 110 millas del Polo Norte durante un período de 10 horas el 28 de junio, incluido un rayo de hielo de nube a mar, dijo Ryan Said, científico de investigación e ingeniero de sistemas de Vaisala que ayudó a desarrollar el sistema GLD360.

"El destello más cercano durante este evento climático fue dentro de las 110 millas del Polo Norte a las 16:40:33 UTC, lo que lo convirtió en el rayo más cercano al Polo Norte registrado", dijo Vaisala en un comunicado. "Un relámpago se define como cualquier descarga de electricidad atmosférica (que podría incluir descargas de rayos dentro de la nube o de nube a tierra)".

Estos rayos fueron al norte de 88 grados de latitud norte, en comparación con las descargas de luz de agosto, que estaban por encima de los 85 grados y se encontraban a unas 300 millas del Polo Norte.

El sistema GLD360 detecta rayos utilizando sensores de radio en todo el mundo.

[Un rayo cayó cerca del Polo Norte 48 veces el sábado, mientras continúa el rápido calentamiento del Ártico]

Después de la tormenta del Ártico de agosto, Vaisala examinó su base de datos para ver si había habido actividad de rayos anterior y similar.

"Lo que encontramos fue tan inusual que tuvimos que investigar más para asegurarnos de que todo fuera consistente con nuestros datos", dijo la compañía en un comunicado.

La red de Vaisala comenzó a rastrear la actividad mundial de los rayos en 2009, pero la compañía tiene archivos de sus datos desde 2012 solamente. La red puede distinguir entre descargas de rayos dentro de las nubes y las que ocurren entre las nubes y el suelo.

"Mirando hacia atrás a través de nuestros datos durante los últimos ocho veranos, no vemos ninguna actividad previa de rayos que haya estado tan cerca del punto más septentrional del planeta", dijo la compañía.

Los rayos pueden ser otra señal de un clima ártico que cambia rápidamente, aunque es posible que los rayos tan cercanos al polo hayan sucedido antes y simplemente no se hayan observado.

La rareza de las observaciones de rayos del Ártico llevó a Said y su equipo de investigación a trabajar durante dos semanas para validar y visualizar los datos para asegurarse de que no hubiera errores involucrados. Compararon los datos de rayos con las observaciones satelitales de la Administración Nacional Oceánica y Atmosférica y encontraron un sistema meteorológico sobre el Ártico el 28 de junio que era capaz de producir descargas de rayos.

"Además, observamos los sensores de nuestro GLD360 y cada rayo fue confirmado por al menos cuatro sensores (se necesitan tres para la validación). Más de la mitad de nuestros sensores confirmaron un relámpago ”, dijo la compañía en un comunicado.


El cortador de la Guardia Costera de EE. UU., Healy, navega por la niebla y el hielo en el Océano Ártico el 1 de agosto de 2017. (Bonnie Jo Mount / The Washington Post)
"Si viéramos los eventos de rayos del 28 de junio de 2019, casi en cualquier otro lugar de la Tierra, no habríamos cuestionado su validez", dijo Said. Dijo que existe una incertidumbre persistente, porque si las ondas de radio emitidas por un rayo son demasiado débiles para ser detectadas por al menos tres de los sensores de Vaisala, la red de detección no lo registrará.

"Entonces, aunque la tasa de rayos en esta tormenta fue indudablemente bastante baja, solo detectamos 19 destellos en un lapso de tiempo de 10 horas, puede haber más destellos que no detectamos", dijo Said.

“El resultado final, basado en nuestros datos que se remontan a 2012, 28 de junio de 2019, es la fecha del flash de iluminación más cercano al Polo Norte registrado, a 110 millas. Este flash se grabó mucho antes y está mucho más cerca que la reciente detección del 10 de agosto de 2019 ".

Las tormentas árticas pueden ser más comunes
La presencia de tormentas eléctricas significa que la atmósfera cerca del Polo Norte era lo suficientemente inestable, con suficiente aire cálido y húmedo en la atmósfera inferior a media, para dar lugar a ellas. Por lo general, el aire es demasiado frío y estable en esa parte del mundo para soportar los ingredientes necesarios para tales tormentas. Dicho especula que el rayo fue provocado por el aire húmedo e inestable a mayores altitudes que se importó de partes del Ártico que carecían de hielo marino en ese momento, dado que el aire en las capas más bajas de la atmósfera sobre el hielo marino generalmente es demasiado estable para subir lo suficientemente alto en la atmósfera como para formar tormentas eléctricas.

"El mecanismo de elevación probablemente estaba justo por encima del aire frío, justo por encima del hielo", dijo en una entrevista.

La gran mayoría de las tormentas eléctricas de la Tierra se producen en latitudes más bajas, donde la combinación de temperaturas más altas y humedad las provoca con mayor facilidad. Sin embargo, a medida que Alaska y otras partes del Ártico se han calentado en respuesta al cambio climático global causado por los humanos, las tormentas eléctricas están comenzando a principios de año y se extienden a áreas que no solían ver muchos eventos como la vertiente norte de Alaska.

Según Said, la red GLD360 detecta aproximadamente 2.5 mil millones de descargas de rayos cada año, o alrededor de 80 descargas por segundo. Sin embargo, solo se detectan algunas tormentas eléctricas por año sobre el Círculo Polar Ártico.


Zack Labe

@ZLabe
Las temperaturas de la superficie del mar por encima del promedio continúan en casi todo el Océano Ártico. Esto es particularmente evidente en áreas de aguas abiertas donde se habría encontrado cobertura de hielo marino en los últimos años.

[Gráfico y métodos de http://ocean.dmi.dk/satellite/index.uk.php ...]

Mapa de anomalías de la temperatura de la superficie del mar en el Océano Ártico
130
10:47 PM - 19 de agosto de 2019
Información y privacidad de los anuncios de Twitter
117 personas están hablando de esto
La pérdida casi récord de hielo marino en el Ártico en el verano ha llevado a temperaturas de la superficie del mar significativamente superiores a la media en todo el Ártico, lo que puede estar contribuyendo a masas de aire inusualmente cálidas y húmedas, incluso sobre la capa de hielo restante en el Ártico central. Oceano. Alaska, por ejemplo, ha visto que la humedad está muy por encima del promedio, desmintiendo la reputación de ese estado de veranos principalmente frescos y secos.

El sistema de detección de Vaisala utiliza sensores que pueden detectar las señales de radio de muy baja frecuencia asociadas con descargas de rayos a más de 6,000 millas de distancia. Al combinar el tiempo de llegada y la información de ángulo de múltiples sensores, la red puede recoger más del 80 por ciento de los rayos y determinar su ubicación con una precisión media de aproximadamente una milla y media.

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Mié Ago 28, 2019 8:21 pm

According to an analysis relying on Vaisala’s GLD360 lightning detection network, there were a remarkable 19 lightning discharges between 130 and 110 miles from the North Pole over a 10-hour period on June 28, including a cloud-to-sea ice lightning strike, said Ryan Said, a Vaisala research scientist and systems engineer who helped develop the GLD360 system.

Mierd... Pagaría por ver una foto de eso.
Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Nube
Mensajes: 211
Registrado: Dom Abr 01, 2012 7:21 am

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Nube » Dom Sep 08, 2019 4:36 pm

El agujero de ozono, fuertemente asimétrico y desplazado hacia Sudamérica, probablemente termine siendo más pequeño que el de 2002.
http://www.temis.nl/ozone/

Según estos australianos del BOM, esto desplazaría los oestes hacia el ecuador el próximo mes:
https://theconversation.com/the-air-abo ... lia-123080

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Jue Oct 17, 2019 12:38 pm

Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Jue Dic 05, 2019 3:42 pm

Base Belgrano II con 7 grados a las 18z y subiendo.
Le falta para sus 10,1 de máxima absoluta del 21/1/1999 y tampoco supera el récord de diciembre, pero está bastante bien.
Los 7 grados se alcanzaron/superaron allí un puñado de veces la última década, casualmente la última el 25/11 pasado que tuvo 7,0 de máxima.
Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Avatar de Usuario
Ezequiel15
Mensajes: 10821
Registrado: Lun Ene 23, 2012 4:18 pm
Ubicación: Ramos Mejia, I Casanova o Monserrat
Contactar:

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ezequiel15 » Jue Feb 06, 2020 1:43 pm

In GFS we don't trust
Los datos que escribo en Clima siempre son de OCBA.
https://infometeoba.blogspot.com.ar/

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Jue Feb 06, 2020 1:58 pm

Justo venía a subir esto... Y ojo que es una horaria, vamos a ver a cuánto se llega.
Marambio a las 15z estaba en 14,1, y está en valores récord para febrero.
Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Avatar de Usuario
Ernest
Mensajes: 10933
Registrado: Vie Jul 17, 2009 10:54 pm
Ubicación: Balvanera, CABA

Re: Regiones polares (Ártico y Antártida)

Mensaje por Ernest » Jue Feb 06, 2020 3:15 pm

Bueno, ha bajado la temperatura en Esperanza a las 18z y está en 15,7. Marambio sube levemente y registra 15,6 a la misma hora.
Did you want to talk about the weather, or were you just making chitchat?

Twitter: @ErnestoMeteo

Responder